EXPLORE THE CULTURAL LANDSCAPE FROM A NEW PERSPECTIVE

The Scenic Rim Regional Council’s Cultural Services team is hitting the road in August to meet artists, young creatives and community members with a view on how they see the development of the Scenic Rim’s cultural landscape, in a project offering a new perspective of the region’s creative future.

The team is visiting Canungra, Tamborine Mountain, Beaudesert and Boonah to meet community members from across the creative spectrum, from accomplished artists to budding creatives and those who may not know a lot about art but know what they like.

Scenic Rim Arts Reference Group Chair Cr Nadia O’Carroll said Council also wanted community members to share their ideas for projects that could be assisted by the Regional Arts Development Fund (RADF) ahead of the September closing date for the next funding round.

Strategic themes for RADF projects in 2018-19 are centred on children and families, place-making, professional development and artists-in-residence.

“We are keen to talk to young people interested in kick-starting a career in the arts and applying for our new ‘launch pad’ young creatives small arts grants, members of our community with a story to tell, artists of all genres wanting to expand or extend their practice and anyone wanting to develop a creative or heritage project,” Cr O’Carroll said.

“Members of the community have the opportunity to be part of a group discussion or speak one-on-one in a 10-minute session with Council’s Heritage and Public Art Officer.”

The Cultural Mapping project is focused on exploring the region’s creative strengths and what makes it unique.

“Cultural Mapping of the Scenic Rim is an interactive process to identify the resources – tangible and intangible – the people, places, events, organisations, stories and values that make up our cultural identity,” she said.

Community members are invited to be a part of interactive workshop-style events which will run from 6pm to 8pm, with a 6.30pm start and light super provided, on:

 Monday 6 August at Moriarty Park, Canungra

 Tuesday 7th August at the Vonda Youngman Community Centre, Tamborine Mountain

 Wednesday 8 August at The Centre Beaudesert, and

 Thursday 9 August at the Boonah Cultural Centre

 

For catering purposes, participants are asked to RSVP by close of business Monday 6 August and also advise of any food intolerances. RSVP 5540 5050 or thecentre@scenicrim.qld.gov.au Notes from the sessions will also be made available via email for all those wishing to register.

For further information visit www.liveatthecentre.com.au or contact Council’s RADF, Heritage and Public Art Officer via email at mark.pa@scenicrim.qld.gov.au

Attached image: Local creatives Janene Gardner, Jaap Vogel and Bec Anderson who are interested in shaping the vision for the Scenic Rim through the Cultural Mapping project.

 

Scenic Rim Regional Council Budget 2018-2019

Scenic Rim Mayor Greg Christensen (left) and Chief Executive Officer Jon Gibbons

BUDGET FOCUSES ON REGION’S SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

The continued renewal and restoration of the region’s road and bridge network is a key focus of Scenic Rim Regional Council’s $112 million Budget for 2018-19.

Mayor Greg Christensen said Council’s Budget included $26 million for capital improvements to roads, bridges, footpaths and drainage across the Scenic Rim to meet the growing needs of a growing region.

“Structured under our Corporate Plan, Scenic Rim 2023, this year’s Budget reflects Council’s mission to enable a sustainable future for our region that enhances our unique rural communities and environments,” he said.

In 2018-19, Council is planning to complete $25 million of flood restoration, as well as Betterment works to improve the resilience of local infrastructure to damage from future flooding. The total flood restoration and Betterment works being delivered across the 2017-18 and 2018-19 financial years will account for more than $55 million when completed.

“Our financial settings for the year ahead are geared to sustainable economic development and growth which relies heavily on infrastructure and services.

“Roads and bridges not only connect the communities of our region but are key drivers of our regional economy and our investment in infrastructure aligns with the vision we share with the community for the Scenic Rim as a sustainable and prosperous economy.”

Ongoing works to repair $38 million in damage to roads and bridges from ex-Tropical Cyclone Debbie in 2017 are to be completed by the end of the 2018-19 year, with 75 per cent of the funding from the Natural Disaster Relief and Recovery Arrangements from the Australian Government and 25 per cent from the Queensland Government.

Council continues to supplement more than $8 million of Betterment funding from the Australian and Queensland Governments to ensure key roads and bridges will be more resilient to damage from future flooding during extreme weather events.

“Through sound asset management practices, we are ensuring the best value to ratepayers for our investment in infrastructure that provides the impetus to the ongoing growth and economic development of our region,” Cr Christensen said.

Total capital and operational expenditure for Council in 2018-19 includes:

 Roads and Bridges                                   $34.22 million

 Disaster Restoration                                 $15 million

 Vibrant and Active Towns and Villages   $1.30 million

 Community buildings and facilities          $7.38 million

 Parks and Gardens                                   $3.22 million

 Community and Cultural programs          $5.82 million

 Waste Operations                                     $8.60 million

 Planning                                                     $2.87 million

 Health, Building and Environment           $5.22 million

Cr Christensen said the Budget balanced community needs and the Queensland Government’s legislative criteria which requires councils to generate revenue through rates linked to property valuations.

Individual rating outcomes will vary in 2018-19 following the State Government’s land valuations of 2018, the first in three years.

“With valuation increases of up to 80 per cent in some areas, we recognise the valid concerns of residents in relation to the potential impact of significant increases in parts of our region,” Cr Christensen said.

“These were taken into account in developing this year’s ratings outcomes.

“After considering a range of options, we have adopted a model of three-year land valuation averaging, coupled with rate capping, to lessen the effect on rates outcomes resulting from the valuations volatility.

“This means a 2.1 per cent increase in the minimum rate for residential and rural principal places of residence. A capped nine per cent increase has been applied for rates on rural and residential properties that are a principal place of residence.”

Seventy-five per cent of principal place of residence ratepayers will have an increase of less than 2.5 per cent, while half of those will experience no rate increase.

“In simple terms, for an owner-occupied residence on the minimum general rate of $1,203, an increase of 2.1 per cent represents a difference of $25 a year or 48 cents per week,” Cr Christensen said.

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The full text of the Community Budget Report, with additional media releases, is availablehere

Beechmont Community Conversations – Monday 12 February 2018 – 6pm~8pm

 

BE PART OF THE DIALOGUE AT COMMUNITY CONVERSATIONS
Mayor Cr Greg Christensen
Mayor Cr Greg Christensen

Scenic Rim residents are invited to be part of the dialogue when Mayor Greg Christensen presents a series of Community Conversations throughout the region next month.

Beaudesert, Tamborine Mountain, Beechmont, Boonah and Canungra will be venues for the community forums which will run from Tuesday February 6 to Thursday February 15.

Mayor Greg Christensen urges Scenic Rim residents not to miss an important opportunity to learn more about Council’s role in the community and have their say to help guid future planning.

“These Community Conversations aim to provide a clearer picture of how we operate and what informs our decision making,” he said.

Cr Virginia West
Cr Virginia West

“For those who have not already done so, it’s also a great opportunity to meet their local Councillors, as well as to provide feedback on what they see as priorities within the scope of our operations.

“Our constant challenge is to balance financial sustainability against community demand for services as the decisions we make today will have an impact, not only on this year’s Budget or the next, but also will represent a legacy for future generations.”

Also up for discussion is the current review of the Scenic Rim Community Plan 2011-2016, which was developed as a shared vision between Council and residents of the Scenic Rim.

“As we’re now at mid-point in our 15-year journey, it’s worthwhile to pause and reflect on how we are travelling and to update some areas of the plan to take us forward,” Cr Christensen said.

Community Conversations will run from 6pm to 8pm (doors opening at 5:30pm) at the following venues on these dates:

* The Centre, Beaudesert, on Tuesday 6 February
* Vonda Youngman Community Centre, Tamborine Mountain, Thursday 8 February
* Hall on Graceleigh, Beechmont, Monday 12 February
* Boonah Cultural Centre, Tuesday 13 February
* Canungra State School, Canungra, on Thursday 15 February

The brand new Bromelton terminal received its very first freight train on 21 January 2017

Bromelton had its first freight train arriving on 21 January 2017 at the SCT terminal. After many years of planning, building and organising this anchor tenant of the brand new Bromelton logistics and transport estate near Beaudesert has pulled it off and made it happen.

This company appears to thrive on a pioneering spirit. They run freight train services between Perth, Adelaide, Melbourne, Sydney and now Bromelton as ther main Brisbane termnal. And not little dinky-toy trains. They’re running freight-only trains of 1.5 km in length with their own rolling stock on standard gauge rail. This company owns and operates 25 locomotives and 600 pieces of rolling stock. Have a look at this movie on the very first freigh train arrival in Bromelton:

The Scenic Rim Regional Council and the Queensland Transport and Logistics Council held their Bromelton Regional Transport Forum on 28 March 2017 in The Centre, Beaudesert. Well attended by the logistics fraternity and neighbouring municipal/ regional council representatives. Quite an enlightening event that drives home the importance of having a new hive of economic activity in your town.

The numbers on freight carried with container trains and B-doubles are just massive. The anchor tenant SCT has commenced freight train operations on Bromelton during January 2017 and are pretty much connecting all of South-East Queensland and the Port of Brisbane with standard gauge rail to Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide and Perth. In this scheme, the upgrade of the Mount Lindesay Highway and the Bromelton by-pass will be a welcome development. SRRC Mayor Cr Christensen told the meeting that the Bromelton development would provide something like 1500 jobs and the economic offspring of that for Beaudesert will be a tremendous boost.

And what does that mean for Beechmont. Well, if you ever lived in the big smoke then spending an hour to get to work and another hour to get back home is nothing new to big city dwellers. It’s nothing out of the ordinary for the towns people. But when you live in Beechmont you’ll get spoiled with the country style of living. And even if you can drive to Beaudesert well within the hour without breaking the speed limits, it sounds for the locals like going to another planet. It is not. The road via Canungra and Mundoolin junction is actually quite good and an easy stretch. Industrial hives like Bromelton tend to generate a lot of business for all sorts of smaller operations nearby and that is precisely what it is meant to do. People working and earning their money on Bromelton or by servicing businesses related to Bromelton will bring their family to live nearby, spend money to eat, send their kids to the local schools, join the local clubs and all of that is good news for the regio.

With SCT now having started operations it looks like there will be a rapid development for Bromelton as a major regional Transport and Logistics hub. Well done SRRC.

Cultural Trails of the Scenic Rim – 2017

Our very own Scenic Rim Regional Council has published a sweet little booklet featuring Open Studios and Events during 2017, called “Cultural Trails of the Scenic Rim”.  No, no walking trails or bike trails but rather a collection of local artists presenting their work for our viewing pleasure. You can pick up your copy from the libraries, Council Offices, Tourist info centres and of course the Beechmont Coffeeshop.

Beechmont and Canungra come out in 2017 with three entries and open studios on 3 & 4 June 2017:

Canungra – Erica Bates
Beechmont – Dave Groom
Beechmont – Wendy Trulson